2010-10-16

How to Install Android on Ubuntu Linux

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Once again I've decided that I want to take a look at programming for the Android platform. One of the first things to do is to get an Android emulator and a programming environment setup. After searching around a few different sites to get the instructions I've compiled the steps to get an emulator working under Ubuntu Linux here.

Android SDK Manager

I followed the steps on the android site. Using the command line in Ubuntu, here are the steps to follow:

Install OpenJDK:

sudo apt-get install openjdk-6-jre

If you are running a 64-bit OS, then install the needed 32-bit libs:

sudo apt-get install ia32-libs

Download the latest SDK from the Android site (which, as I write this, is android-sdkr07-linuxx86.tgz).

Uncompress the tarball into your home directory and rename it:

tar xfvz android-sdk_r07-linux_x86.tgz
mv android-sdk-linux_x86 android-sdk

Here are all of the above steps combined:

sudo apt-get -y install openjdk-6-jre
uname -m | grep -q "\(x86_64\|ia64\)" && sudo apt-get -y install ia32-libs
cd
wget http://dl.google.com/android/android-sdk_r07-linux_x86.tgz
tar xfvz android-sdk_r07-linux_x86.tgz
[ -e android-sdk ] && mv android-sdk android-sdk.$(date +%y%m%d)
mv android-sdk-linux_x86 android-sdk

Optionally you may add the Android tools directories to your PATH by adding the following to your .bashrc file:

export PATH=${PATH}:${HOME}/android-sdk/tools:${HOME}/android-sdk/platform-tools

Now run the Android SDK and AVD Manager via:

~/android-sdk/tools/android

Or, if you are running GNOME, make a custom application launcher, by either right-clicking a panel and selecting Add to panel… then adding a Custom Application Launcher, or by right-clicking the Main Menu and selecting Edit Menus then select Programming then New Item. The custom application launcher should have the following properties (substitute your $HOME directory for /home/USERNAME):

Now configure the Android Manager:

You can now run this virtual android image by clicking the Start… button. Or from the command line (replacing NAME with the name of the virtual you created):

~/android-sdk/tools/emulator @NAME

You can also create a custom application launcher with that command.

The next time you want to make sure your android installation is updated you can run:

~/android-sdk/tools/android update sdk

#+BEGINCOMMENT

Android on VirtualBox

I followed the steps this article. Using the command line in Ubuntu, here are the steps to follow:

First, if you do not already have VirtualBox installed, you can install the open source edition with the following command:

sudo apt-get install virtualbox-ose

Now, under your Accessories menu you should see the VirtualBox OSE launcher. #+ENDCOMMENT

Eclipse IDE

Even though I prefer to code in Emacs whenever possible, the recommended method of programming for the Android platform is with the Eclipse IDE. So, I'm starting with that at least until I get more used to Android programming.

At first I tried to install Eclipse with apt-get like so:

sudo apt-get install eclipse

However, I could not get the Android Development Tools to install with that version of Eclipse (Galileo v3.5.2). So, like many others have, I decided to use the latest version from their web site. I downloaded the 64-bit Eclipse Classic (Helios v3.6.1) tarball from their download page. You should download the correct version for your architecture and uncompress it in your home directory.

tar zxvf eclipse-SDK-3.6.1-linux-gtk-x86_64.tar.gz

You might want to create a custom application launcher for it with these settings:

Now launch Eclipse. Then select Install New Software from the Help menu and add the following sites:

Install everything from each of them in the above order.

After that finishes, select Preferences from the Window menu. Select Android on the left and set the SDK Location to /home/USERNAME/android-sdk or wherever you installed the Android SDK. When you apply it you should see a list of Android target versions. OK the change.

Now when you create a new project, you can pick Android as a type.

James DeBragga [Windows Consumer Product Manager]: Android is "free like a puppy".

spark: "Free like a puppy" is certainly much, much better than an atrociously priced and uncontrollably incontinent, rabies-infected mad hound.

Tags: android ubuntu linux programming software technology